Year 7 Music

Curriculum Intents

Music is a significant part of all our lives. Our curriculum aims to deliver a rich and diverse appreciation of the wonder of music all around us, through understanding, performing and creating. We aim to provide a curriculum which ignites a desire to engage with, and appreciate a range of genres, and make links through time with key musical concepts. Our focus is for all students to have access to an all inclusive curriculum with the range of skills required to achieve optimum musical understanding, the technical, the constructive and the expressive.

Musical Journey

Our curriculum journey is sequenced to impart the knowledge necessary for successful application of the topic taught. Retrieval across units is a priority, this refreshes and embeds the information previously taught and builds upon it. Students experience development in a range of knowledge classes.

Musical Knowledge

‘Tacit’ knowledge which is gained through experience and immersion within a task or topic.

‘Declarative’ knowledge which pulls upon the facts and information stored.

‘Procedural’ knowledge that is exercised through the opportunity to perform and demonstrate expression and creativity.

To exercise this knowledge students are provided with regular opportunities to implement their skills and understanding practically. Topics across the curriculum all reflect aspects of the three learning focuses – Listening and Appraising, Performance and Composition.

We believe our curriculum demonstrates and promotes skills of a wider nature outside of the music classroom, students are taught the value of being part of an equal team within group work, where each person has a specific and essential role. Through the very nature of learning new practical skills inevitably comes the requirement to strive to succeed through independent practice and focussed dedication. We believe this skill is valuable within many aspects of social development.

As a department our focus is to teach knowledge based theories which can be demonstrated and enhanced through practical implementation. Our students are challenged and inspired to question theories taught for clarification, this can prompt reflection and adaptation to teaching methods and strategies.

Music demands high levels of problem solving, we provide students with the tools and methods to create and perform their own music and inspire them with a broad range of styles and genres. We assess through observation, verbal questioning and written evidence. Open ended, and hinge questioning is used to lead students to recap and explore a greater depth of musical appreciation.

Autumn Term 1

Musical Elements & Instruments of the Orchestra

Grammar

Students explore the core musical elements. Pitch, Tempo, Texture, Dynamics, Duration and Timbre. These are taught through listening and appraising exercises. Explanation is provided verbally using language students can relate to. Visual examples are used alongside audio. Students become familiar with a range of orchestral instruments.

Dialectic

Students are provided with a range of listening and practical activities illustrating the different musical elements and orchestral instruments. There is a composition task demonstrating these elements, which is evidenced in the form of a graphic score. Students are given the opportunity to have a go at playing some orchestral instruments.

Rhetoric

Written listening & appraising activities are used. A short composition task of creating a graphic score demonstrates understanding. Students perform their graphic score, this shows their understanding and interpretation of the musical elements. This unit is evidenced in a workbook with an assessment grade for composition.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Music is all around us, students are taught how the elements of music are relevant in any style or genre. These are the building blocks to all music and will be revisited in every topic. Students use their analytical skills to acquire a deeper understanding of the construction and texture within a variety of musical styles. Students are inspired and encouraged to consider taking up an instrument to embellish and support the curriculum. Opportunities for extra curricular music activities within the school are encouraged.

Take up the challenge of learning or developing performance skills on an instrument of choice. This could be continuing to commit to out of school study via instrumental lessons and practice or simply attempting to learn something new either through online tutorials or private instrumental lessons available from the school. Listen to a range of musical styles, maybe some you are not familiar with. Try to identify all the musical elements every time you hear music whether this is on the radio, on a device, computer game, in a film or any time you are exposed to it.

Autumn Term 2

Learning to Read and Play

Grammar

Students learn the names of the notes on the treble clef stave. Students become familiar with their position on the stave, and note values are recognised by their specific names, students identify the relationship between rhythm and pulse.

Dialectic

Students put these skills into practice through reading notation and playing this on a keyboard. Students are required to interpret a variety of notation using the correct rhythmic values. Peer assessment is encouraged through performance.

Rhetoric

This unit is assessed through the performance of a standardised set piece of written music, using just notes from the treble clef on a keyboard. Students receive a Working At Grade that represents the level of melodic and rhythmic accuracy.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Students are encouraged to perform in class to share their achievements with their peers and encourage and motivate others. The performance aspect of this unit is used to enhance confidence and provide a platform where students can gain experiences in presenting their achievements. This is a skill which is required across many other subjects and life experiences. Performances in school concerts and extra curricular ensembles are valuable to enrich their musical experiences, celebrate success and

Have a go at some online notation quizzes https://www.richmanmusicschool.com/products/name-that-note.

Research and download some sheet music of a piece you would like to play. Follow a musical score along to a recording to develop your notation reading skills. Encourage students to rise to the challenge of performing, where it be something musical, a presentation or speech. This enhances confidence in a skill which will be required for many aspects of life. Challenge the mental barriers which may be prohibiting this experience.

Spring Term 1

Ukelele Project

Grammar

Students learn the names of the different parts of the ukulele. A rhyme is devised to remember the names of the strings and where these notes are on the stave in terms of pitch. Students are introduced to the concept of harmony and chords, and learn how these aspects are used in all styles of music.

Dialectic

The practical nature of this unit lends itself to a personal challenge. Students are taught a variety of chords and playing techniques. Within pairs students practise together helping and encouraging each other. Practical skills are taught through teacher demonstration. A new style of notation known as TAB is introduced, students can relate similarities with this and the notation skills learnt in the previous topic.

Rhetoric

Students perform as a class, in small groups and are provided with the opportunity to perform individually. Stretch and challenge opportunities are provided to those who are progressing quickly or who already have previous knowledge or experience. Students complete a workbook recording their progress and key concepts learnt. Assessment data for performance is evidenced in GO 4 Schools.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

This unit will aim to encourage the uptake of a stringed instrument possibly even ukulele or guitar lessons. Students are encouraged to attend the guitar group that takes place weekly after school and use the facilities within the department at lunchtimes to improve their skills.

Continue to practise the skills learnt at home, you could even purchase a ukulele and explore the options of taking lessons. Research some more songs that use the chords learnt and play along with them. Listen to your favourite style of music, can you hear where the chords change. Teach yourself some more chords to provide even more options of repertoire. Purchase a ukulele!

Spring Term 2

Musical Cultures from Around the World

Grammar

Students are introduced to music from different cultures around the world. During this unit students study music from Africa, China and India. Students will become familiar with the melodic, rhythmic and harmonic features from these different cultures and how it relates to the western system of tonality. This topic focuses strongly on rhythm and melodic ostinatos, scales, and harmony.

Dialectic

Students will be given the opportunity to play a range of instruments appropriate to the genre studied. These include African drums, glockenspiels & keyboards. Students are set performance and composition tasks within this unit where a differentiated level of challenge is presented. There is a strong focus on group work and students will be expected to work as an ensemble being considerate to others needs and skills.

Rhetoric

Class and group performances are present in every lesson within this unit. Peer and self assessment are demonstrated and they are assessed on a short composition task focusing on creativity within the constraints of a specific brief. There are clear structured frameworks for composition tasks and attainment outcomes discussed. Students will receive a composition assessment mark recorded in GO 4 Schools.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

World music provides insight into different cultures, communication patterns, rhythms, sounds and ways of making music. Through its nature world music encourages participation in group work and being part of a team. With cultural diversity on the increase the need for students to have cross-cultural knowledge and experiences is very valuable.

Listen to a range of music from different cultures, preferably one we haven’t studied. Watch some performances by some well known world music musicians and try to recognise the techniques they use and how they relate to the concepts studied. Research the styles of music popular within a variety of cultures when travelling. Join some local music groups such as African drumming, Samba bands.

Summer Term 1

Sea Shanties and Folk Music

Grammar

Students are taught the origins of the sea shanty, with reference to their historical routes students recognise these as being an English traditional work-song dating back hundreds of years. This draws on previous knowledge learnt during the world music unit where reference to work songs and traditional elements were seen in African music especially. Characteristics of the music itself are recognised to enable students to identify this genre of music by them.

Dialectic

Students are required to make comparisons with three sea shanties recognising the key features, such as call & Response, improvisation, acapella singing. They are challenged to draw on their previous knowledge of pitch and duration and required to perform a famous sea shanty by ear. The composition task will encourage students to expand on their creative skills and reflect their understanding of shanty characteristics.

Rhetoric

This unit will culminate in both performance and compositions tasks, singing will be a prominent feature through a performance of the famous sea shanty ‘Wellerman’. Composition tasks will be completed on ‘Chrome Lab’ software available from our online learning package from Essex Music Services. Performance and composition assessment data will be recorded on GO 4 Schools.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

This unit reflects cross curricular links with history/geography and other performing arts subject such as drama and dance. Students will perform this song as a year group at the summer concert.

Research local sea shanty groups ‘The Motley Crew’ in Brightlingsea. Listen to a range of other sea shanties via YouTube and TikTok. Practise singing the song and learning the lyrics for the summer concert. Book tickets to watch the concert and celebrate musical success this year.

Summer Term 2

Introduction to Music Technology

Grammar

Students will be introduced to music technology using the sequencing programme Logic Pro X. This topic builds on previous knowledge of the musical elements, rhythm and notation and will focus on the different components within a piece music, Melody, Rhythm and Harmony. Students become familiar with music technology vocab such as MIDI, Sequencer and Sample.

Dialectic

Students will construct a short composition using pre recorded rhythmic and melodic samples. Students learn how to use simple editing techniques such as looping, dragging and automation. Students will explore how the different textures within a track are sequenced together, through experimenting with arranging and editing a selection of pre recorded samples.

Rhetoric

Assessment of progress will be measured through the demonstration of understanding through a sequenced composition. Criteria for assessment will focus on the overall effectiveness of the composition, and how melodic and rhythmic samples have been edited appropriately to achieve a successful outcome.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

This unit should encourage students to appreciate the techniques and skills required to produce a piece of sequenced music. As this is a popular genre within their peer groups this will encourage a deeper understanding of why they like and appreciate a particular style and how this style of music is so closely linked to all styles when identifying the different components. This will enrich their experience when listening to music and a range of settings and environments.

Experiment with other online music tech software, such as ‘Band Lab’ ‘Sound Trap’ ‘Garageband’ Listen to a range of electro Dance music and try to identify the features learnt when composing on Logic Pro X.

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