Year 7 Computer Science

Curriculum Intents

Our aim through the computing curriculum is to ensure that all students are digitally literate, able to create digital content confidently, know how to share this with others, and also know how to keep themselves safe whilst doing so. These are important skills in today’s society whether or not a student chooses to make further study of computing one of their academic options as they progress through the school.

Why

Students also need to be able to understand the principles of computer science and be able to think computationally, such as being able to decompose, abstract and model real life scenarios. They will learn to do this through the use of algorithms and both textual and non-textual programming languages. Using a range of software including desktop publishing, spreadsheets,
databases, email and communications applications enables students to see the wider applicability of these general principles and contextualise their learning. Data, and especially personal data, is a valuable commodity. Students will be taught explicitly
how to be safe in a digital world and understand the significance of their ‘digital footprint’.

How

The computing curriculum follows a spiral approach, introducing then revisiting and deepening knowledge in the key areas outlined above. Students will be given opportunities through class-based debates, teacher questioning and class activities to practice the use of these different technologies and to apply their knowledge to relevant scenarios, audiences and purposes.
They will have a chance to test their theories and apply the digital skills they have been taught to see how they work in different software packages/programming languages, and to evaluate their work and think of ways that they can apply their skills to future scenarios in a different way.

The progress that students make is regularly assessed both informally and formally. Assessment methods vary with content to be learnt and ensure that we are assessing students’ practical decomposition, analysis and evaluative skills in line with the curriculum we offer. Practical, computer- based assessments are used alongside traditional paper-based assessments in order that students are familiar and confident with the ways they will be assessed as they progress within the subject/ across the key stages. Assessment allows students to celebrate progress while also highlighted areas for potential improvement.

Autumn Term 1

E-Safety and Key IT Skills

Grammar

Students will be looking at how to use desk-top publishing packages and how to stay safe when using technology.

Dialectic

Students will learn how to edit and make appropriate documents using a range of desktop publishing software. They gain practical experience of these tasks and are given opportunities to apply the skills learnt to a variety of audiences and purposes.

Rhetoric

They are assessed both on their ability to apply the skills throughout the unit and in a formative assessed task.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

E-safety and Key IT Skills

Students will look at the appropriate use of IT systems, how to stay safe online and the effect IT has on society. Students will look at the basics of IT safety including setting appropriate passwords and how to efficiently save and locate work in the cloud. Students will begin to look at how to use DTP appropriately. Students will learn about malware and how it can affect computer systems. Students will learn about how to try to prevent/remove malware and how to maintain their own safety when online. Students will look into the use of social media and how to use it effectively. Students will look at steps to secure IT systems including encryption and the use of passwords as security methods.

Encourage students to look at their use of technology and ensure they are using it safely and to review potential risks when using technology. Encourage students to use software correctly in their everyday life so this becomes a habit, e.g. make sure they send appropriate e-mails with suitable subjects and ask them to think about audiences when making presentations. Websites to support this include www.saferinternet.org and BBC Bitesize.

Autumn Term 2

Computational Thinking

Grammar

Students will learn and practice applying the main skills of computational thinking including decomposition, abstracting and problem-solving.

Dialectic

Students will use these skills and apply them to real-life scenarios.

Rhetoric

Students will be assessed on the work completed in lesson as well as a formative end of topic written assessment.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Computational Thinking

Students will learn key components of computational thinking including decomposition, abstracting and problem-solving. Students will learn how to write algorithms using pseudocode and flowcharts incorporating programming techniques such as iteration, selection, variables and inputs.

Encourage students to develop problem solving skills. Completing tasks such as Sudoku, Rebus Puzzles and other brainteaser activities can really help to develop relevant skills. There are also lots of free programming websites where they can apply and practice these skills such as Scratch, Kodu, Microbit and code.org.

Spring Term 1

Micro:Bit

Grammar

Students will apply computational thinking skills and programming constructs to a block based language.

Dialectic

Students will use these skills and apply them to a range of different scenarios.

Rhetoric

Students will be assessed both formatively and summatively, through knowledge based homework and a written end of topic test

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Micro:Bit

Students will be applying computational thinking skills and basic programming constructs using a block based programming language. They will learn how to work with input from other sources. Students will look at different data types , the difference between variables and constants and how to use these appropriately. Students will learn how to use selection and iteration appropriately and how to apply them to different scenarios.

Micro:Bit is a free BBC website and students can complete many different projects on here to practice the skills learnt in lesson. There is a simluator on screen, so they do not need to own a device to see how it works

Spring Term 2

Spreadsheets

Grammar

Students will learn how to manipulate data using spreadsheets.

Dialectic

Students will use these skills and apply them to a range of different scenarios.

Rhetoric

They will be assessed in a practical end of topic scenario which provides them with the opportunity to select and use relevant skills to complete an assigned task.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Spreadsheets

Students will learn how to manipulate data using spreadsheet software, Students will learn how to sort and filter data. They will learn how to use basic formulas and functions. Students will learn how to format data appropriately and present in both table and graph format to suit a given scenario.

Students can access google sheets for free using their school log-in details. They can use this to practice the skills learnt in lesson. Websites like BBC Bitesize or Teach-ICT are also useful.

Summer Term

How Computers Work

Grammar

Students will learn about how the CPU works and what affects performance.

Dialectic

Students will be applying knowledge to exam-style questions in lessons which test their higher-order thinking skills and through knowledge based homework.

Rhetoric

Students will be assessed with a formative written assessment at the end of the unit.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

How Computers Work

Students will take a look at how technology has developed, they will also research some of the key people who have played a part in the development of technologoy. Students will also look at the hardware and software within a computer system including input , output and storage devices. Students will look at how the CPU works, components within the CPU and what can affect CPU performance.

Students can research any devices they have at home online. Looking at the specification and how this impacts the performance of the device will help them to make real-life links. Students can use sites like PC World to look up devices that may be used for different purposes such as work or gaming and see how their specification differs to suit the required performance.

You can have conversations with students and talk about the changes you have seen in Computing and ask them to think/research what changes they predict we might see in the future of Computing.

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