Year 11 Geography

Curriculum Intent

Our aim in the Philip Morant geography department is to inspire in students a curiosity and fascination about the world and its people that will remain with them for the rest of their lives. We aim to offer our young people an interesting, engaging, relevant and cumulatively challenging curriculum, which will provide students with the valuable knowledge, and equip them with the intangible skills, which will support them in the next stages of their lives.

How

Our students will acquire broad locational and place knowledge whilst studying geography at Philip Morant, and will be equipped with knowledge about diverse places, people, resources and natural and human environments, together with a deep understanding of the Earth’s key physical and human processes. Students will continuously deepen their understanding of the interaction between the human and the physical as they progress through our geography curriculum.

Our students learn in conjunction with the acquisition of a mélange of skills, such as collecting, analysing and communicating with data, interpreting a range of visual, digital and written sources, and communicating geographical information and data through maps, numerical and quantitative skills, and writing at length.

Why

It is imperative that our young people have an awareness and a genuine consideration of the important geographical issues which surround their everyday lives. We see it as our responsibility to educate the future generations of our town, county and country in a way that allows them to be cautious, considerate and curious of the physical and human environment around them, having a sound awareness that every action they make will have ramifications on others, be it in the present or in the future.

Autumn Term

Urban Issues and Challenges

Grammar

Before analysing the impacts of Urban Issues, students learn the fundamentals of urbanisation to understand the reasons why towns and cities grow.

Dialectic

Students learn through the analysis of urban provision images, presentations of graphical data on maps and graphs, video sources, online news literature, and through the production and analysis of GIS maps.

Rhetoric

Students will be assessed by a combination of; ongoing low stakes testing, spoken contributions in class, diagram annotation, and a variety of different written tasks. Students also have the opportunity to showcase their abilities with GIS mapping.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

The module of Urban Issues and Challenges commences with the study of the concept or urbanisation and the two main causes of it; natural population increase and rural to urban migration.

Students then proceed to study the urbanisation process in Lagos, a rapidly urbanising city in the newly emerging economy of Nigeria. The reasons for the urbanisation of Lagos are studied, along with the collection of opportunities and challenges which are presented to the people of the city because of it. For example, the increased economic activity and employment opportunities this brings, and the establishment of slum communities such as Mokoko.

Visit a City
Visit a local urban area with your child, be it a local city such as Colchester, a national city such as London or Birmingham, or a global city whilst on holiday. As you walk around the city enjoying the sites, start a dialogue with your child about the challenges which the city might be facing, and the potential solutions to these challenges.

Play Top Trumps
Create a pack of 30 city top trumps cards together and play. Include numbers such as; population, wealth, area, tallest building. Your child will learn about important urban areas around the world, at the same time as having fun with the family. Top tip, the back of an atlas will likely provide a lot of the numbers you will be looking for when creating your top trumps cards.

Watch a movie
Watch a movie set in a particular city. Ask your child questions whilst watching; I wonder how many tourists this city gets each year? What might the tourists visit? How will this help the local people? How is this city similar or different to other cities we’ve visited? Is this a wealthy or poor city? How can you tell?

Consider relocating
Perhaps only theoretically, but have a look at houses for sale on sites such as Rightmove or Zoopla. Ask your child if they would like to live in this place. Why, why not? What might be the good things and bad things about living in rural areas / urban areas?

Spring Term 1

The Changing Economic World

Grammar

Before analysing the impacts of Economic Issues, students learn the fundamentals of economic types to understand the reasons why we have issues in development.

Dialectic

Students learn through the analysis of economic provision images, presentations of graphical data on maps and graphs, video sources, online news literature, and through the production and analysis of GIS maps.

Rhetoric

Students will be assessed by a combination of; ongoing low stakes testing, spoken contributions in class, diagram annotation, and a variety of different written tasks. Students also have the opportunity to showcase their abilities with GIS mapping.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

This module begins with pupils learning about the concept of international development, and the causes of, effects of, and solutions to, the international development gap.

Pupils then learn about the transition of Nigeria from a Low Income Country to a Newly Emerging Economy due to the discovery of oil in the Niger delta, and the implications which this transition has had on the economy, society and environment, in addition to the relationship which Nigeria has with the wider world.

Play Top Trumps
Create a pack of top trump cards for 30 countries around the world. Create a template and then fill the cards with key facts about each country’s development, such as the life expectancy, GDP, literacy rate and unemployment rate. Then play!

Try fairtrade
Fair trade deals are one of the main mechanisms used by higher income countries such as the UK when it comes to supporting the development of lower income countries. On your weekly shop, have your child help you with only buying fair trade products that week. They would need to scan every item for the fair trade mark. Compare the cost of your shopping to the week before, and the taste of your meals to that of the week before – you might be surprised!

Make a charitable contribution
As well as fair trade, giving lower income countries aid is an important instrument in helping a countries development. Even if it is only a £1 donation, ask your child to identify a charity they would like to donate to. Ask them to justify why they have chosen to donate to that charity, and how the donation will help that country to develop.

Guide their thought patterns
When you visit a new place, be it a trip to Africa, a holiday in southern Europe, or whilst visiting another place in the UK, ask your child to compare the development of that place with the development of the place they live in. Ask them what evidence they can see in that area that has brought them to that conclusion.

Spring Term 2

The Challenge of Resource Management

Grammar

Before analysing the impacts of resource management Issues, students learn the fundamentals of resource management to understand the reasons why we have issues in managing resources.

Dialectic

Students learn through the analysis of energy provision images, presentations of graphical data on maps and graphs, video sources, online news literature, and through the production and analysis of GIS maps.

Rhetoric

Students will be assessed by a combination of; ongoing low stakes testing, spoken contributions in class, diagram annotation, and a variety of different written tasks. Students also have the opportunity to showcase their abilities with GIS mapping.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Students begin the challenge of resource management module by studying the variable access to food, water and energy resources around the world, and how these inequalities in resource availability impact upon peoples social and economic well-being.

Students then progress to studying the variable access of food, water and energy resources around the UK, and the issues associated with these resources.

The challenge of resource management unit is concluded with the study of one resource (food, water or energy) in a global context.

Our students study how the global distribution of water resources varies greatly across the globe, and the changing patterns of this distribution as a consequence of a changing climate and changing rainfall / evapotranspiration patterns. Students study the associated issues with this variation in water supply, such as; food insecurity, local, national and international water conflict, a reduction in water quality, and a reduction in economic output.

Finally, pupils evaluate the effectiveness and practicality of management strategies such as rainwater harvesting, water conservation, and the use of greywater.

Try and reduce energy consumption – however that may be? Turning appliances off when not being used. Walking rather than driving. Recycling whatever you can. Having showers for a week rather than baths. You could also make a poster encouraging people to reduce the amount of energy they use and why this is important? Go vegan
Three interesting facts about about reducing energy consumption are;
• Agriculture accounts for twice the amount of GHGs than all cars, boats, trains, and planet.
• If cows were a country, they would be the third biggest emitter of greenhouse gases.
• If everyone went vegan by 2050, food related emissions could reduce by ¾.

Summer Term 

Pre-release Booklet Study

Students are presented with a 6 page source booklet provided by the examination board approximately 12 weeks before students sit their Paper 3 exam.

They will study, examine, and critically assess all sources in the booklet in class, before answering questions about the sources of information in the exam.

Skip to content