Year 10 Computer Science

Curriculum Intents

Our aim through the computing curriculum is to ensure that all students are digitally literate, able to create digital content confidently, know how to share this with others, and also know how to keep themselves safe whilst doing so. These are important skills in today’s society whether or not a student chooses to make further study of computing one of their academic options as they progress through the school.

Why

Students also need to be able to understand the principles of computer science and be able to think computationally, such as being able to decompose, abstract and model real life scenarios. They will learn to do this through the use of algorithms and both textual and non-textual programming languages. Using a range of software including desktop publishing, spreadsheets,
databases, email and communications applications enables students to see the wider applicability of these general principles and contextualise their learning. Data, and especially personal data, is a valuable commodity. Students will be taught explicitly
how to be safe in a digital world and understand the significance of their ‘digital footprint’.

How

The computing curriculum follows a spiral approach, introducing then revisiting and deepening knowledge in the key areas outlined above. Students will be given opportunities through class-based debates, teacher questioning and class activities to practice the use of these different technologies and to apply their knowledge to relevant scenarios, audiences and purposes.
They will have a chance to test their theories and apply the digital skills they have been taught to see how they work in different software packages/programming languages, and to evaluate their work and think of ways that they can apply their skills to future scenarios in a different way.

The progress that students make is regularly assessed both informally and formally. Assessment methods vary with content to be learnt and ensure that we are assessing students’ practical decomposition, analysis and evaluative skills in line with the curriculum we offer. Practical, computer- based assessments are used alongside traditional paper-based assessments in order that students are familiar and confident with the ways they will be assessed as they progress within the subject/ across the key stages. Assessment allows students to celebrate progress while also highlighted areas for potential improvement.

Autumn Term 1

Systems Architecture

Grammar

Students will learn about the hardware used for computers. Students will learn about the components of the CPU.

Dialectic

Students will learn how the CPU works and performs, they will apply this knowledge to real-life scenarios and exam-style questions.

Rhetoric

Students will be assessed in lessons, through assessed homework and an end -of-topic exam style assessment.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Systems Architecture

Students will learn about Von Neumann Architecture, Embedded systems and their uses. Students will also look at what affects the performance of the Central Processing Units and how components work together to allow computers to process instructions.

Students can use Seneca to embed their learning and also use websites such as BBC Bitesize and Teach-ICT and answer questions from past papers available on the OCR website.

Autumn Term 2

Programming Fundamentals

Grammar

Students will continue to learn about programming techniques such as inputs, outputs, selection and iteration. They will apply these to real–world scenarios. Students will spend time each term programming to help embed their skills.

Dialectic

Students will learn how to apply programming techniques in Python which is a high-level language. Students will apply this knowledge to real-life scenarios and exam-style questions.

Rhetoric

Students will be assessed in lessons, through assessed homework and an end -of-topic exam style assessment.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Programming Fundamentals

Students will continue to learn about programming techniques such as inputs,outputs,selection and iteration. They will apply these to real-world scenarios. Students will spend time each term programming to help embed their skills.

Python is a free downloadable software, and there are also many other hosted websites such as Trinket.io and Replit.com that students can use to practice programming skills. Websites such as W3schools have a very clear breakdown of topics should students be struggling with an aspect. There are also websites such as PythonSponge and Sololearn, which provide a range of activities to practice the use of Python and also mark them for students.

Spring Term 1

Boolean Logic

Grammar

Students will learn to create simple and advance logic gates and truth tables using the boolean operators such as AND, OR or NOT.

Dialectic

Students will learn about boolean logic and will apply this to real-life scenarios and exam-style questions.

Rhetoric

Students will be assessed in lessons, through assessed homework and an end -of-topic exam style assessment.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Boolean Logic

Students will learn about different types of logic gates, they will learn how to combine these gates to suit different scenarios. Students will learn and practice how to create truth tables based on the inputs/outputs of logic diagrams.

Students can use websites such as logic.ly which allows students to make logic diagrams and see them in action. Students can also use Seneca to embed their learning and also use websites such as BBC Bitesize and Teach-ICT and answer questions from past papers available on the OCR website.

Spring Term 2

Memory and Storage

Grammar

Students will learn how computers represent data using the binary number system, they will also learn about the hexadecimal number system. Students will also learn about different types of secondary storage and their uses.

Dialectic

Students will learn about boolean logic and will apply this to real-life scenarios and exam-style questions

Rhetoric

Students will be assessed in lessons, through assessed homework and an end -of-topic exam style assessment.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Students will learn why computers use the binary system and how to convert from denary to binary. Students will learn how computers store characters, images and sound using binary. Students will also learn how to do hexadecimal conversions and binary addition. Students will learn about the different types of primary memory including ROM, RAM and Virtual Memory. Students will learn about the different categories of secondary storage such as Magnetic, Solid State and Optical, they will learn about their characteristics and uses.

Students can use websites such as ‘Penjee Binary‘ to practice their use of binary. Students can also use Seneca to embed their learning and also use websites such as BBC Bitesize and Teach-ICT and answer questions from past papers available on the OCR website. Students can think about their own use of secondary storage and why they think different types of storage are more/less suitable for particular purposes.

Summer Term

Algorithms

Grammar

Students will learn to design algorithms using flowcharts, pseudocode and a high-level language (Python). Students will learn about specific algorithms used for searching and sorting.

Dialectic

Students will learn about boolean logic and will apply this to real-life scenarios and exam-style questions.

Rhetoric

Students will be assessed in lessons, through assessed homework and an end -of-topic exam style assessment.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Algorithms

Students will learn to refine, write and design algorithms using flowcharts, pseudocode and a high-level language (Python). Students will learn about specific algorithms used for searching and sorting information such as Bubble-sort, linear search and merge sort.

Students can continue to practice their use of Python. Python is a free downloadable software, and there are also many other hosted websites such as Trinket.io and Replit.com that students can use to practice programming skills. Websites such as W3schools have a very clear breakdown of topics should students be struggling with an aspect.

There are also websites such as PythonSponge and Sololearn, which provide a range of activities to practice the use of Python and also mark them for students. They can use software such as diagrams.net to create digital flowcharts, they can also convert any prior coding projects they have done into flowcharts and vice-versa. Students can also use Seneca to embed their learning and also use websites such as BBC Bitesize and Teach-ICT and answer questions from past papers available on the OCR website.

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