Year 10 Combined Science: Biology

Curriculum Intent

Our intent is to create a fun, engaging and relevant science curriculum, which equips students with the skills that they will need beyond school life. Students should be inquisitive and analytical in their approach. They should be able to debate relevant scientific information and work collaboratively with others. Our hope is that the skills practised, and experiences that students have in their science lessons will be a solid foundation for a lifelong interest in Science.

Why

Our curriculum is designed for students to learn about the products and practices of science in order to develop a sense of wonder about the material world and natural phenomena.

Through our curriculum, students learn scientific knowledge which becomes established through a range of practical work and scientific enquiry, they start to understand that scientific knowledge is open for revision in light of new evidence. By following our curriculum students will gain the ability to debate the significance of science in society and in their own lives. It will provide an excellent foundation for a range of careers which are crucial for economic, environmental and social development.

How

The structure of our curriculum allows for students to move along the path from novice to expert scientists. The important knowledge that students learn is well structured so that it becomes meaningful, flexible and easier to access. Teachers then scaffold and use models to facilitate students in solving complex and interesting scientific problems whilst considering a manageable cognitive load. As new knowledge is taught, it adds to existing knowledge to help to build the ‘big picture’ for students. The relationships between concepts are explicit and students feel that they are making progress as they start to know more, remember more and can do more in Science. The 4 main areas of knowledge that students study in Science are:

Methods
Apparatus and Techniques
Data Analysis
Developing Explanations from Evidence

Our curriculum interleaves the teaching of substantive and disciplinary knowledge so that students do not only know the scientific knowledge, they also have an understanding of the evidence for it. As students go through each key stage building substantive knowledge, they are able to reason scientifically with increasing sophistication and expertise. Substantive knowledge (knowledge of the products of science, such as concepts, laws, theories and models):this is referred to as scientific knowledge and conceptual understanding in the national curriculum disciplinary knowledge (knowledge of how scientific knowledge is generated and grows): this is specified in the ‘working scientifically’ sections of the national curriculum and it includes knowing how to carry out practical procedures We use regular assessment to ensure that where students may have gaps in knowledge, these are tackled so that all students can make progress through our science curriculum.

Autumn Term 1

Cell Biology

Grammar

Cells are the basic unit of all forms of life. In this section we explore how structural differences between types of cells enables them to perform specific functions within the organism. These differences in cells are controlled by genes in the nucleus. For an organism to grow, cells must divide by mitosis producing two new identical cells.

If cells are isolated at an early stage of growth before they have become too specialised, they can retain their ability to grow into a range of different types of cells. This phenomenon has led to the development of stem cell technology. This is a new branch of medicine that allows doctors to repair damaged organs by growing new tissue from stem cells.

Dialectic

Students will use their knowledge to predict the outcome of practical tasks, to analyse the results and report their findings. They will be encouraged to work collaboratively and come to scientific conclusions based on discussions with others.

Rhetoric

Knowledge and skills will be assessed through direct questioning, group discussion, low stakes quizzes and through a longer investigation style task which will run over the course of a number of lessons.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Cells are the basic unit of all forms of life. In this section we explore how structural differences between types of cells enables them to perform specific functions within the organism. These differences in cells are controlled by genes in the nucleus. For an organism to grow, cells must divide by mitosis producing two new identical cells.

If cells are isolated at an early stage of growth before they have become too specialised, they can retain their ability to grow into a range of different types of cells. This phenomenon has led to the development of stem cell technology. This is a new branch of medicine that allows doctors to repair damaged organs by growing new tissue from stem cells.

Go to the Local Country Park. Look through microscopes and see the world through a microscopic lens

Autumn Term 2

Organisation

Grammar

In this section we will learn about the human digestive system which provides the body with nutrients and the respiratory system that provides it with oxygen and removes carbon dioxide. In each case they provide dissolved materials that need to be moved quickly around the body in the blood by the circulatory system.

Damage to any of these systems can be debilitating if not fatal. Although there has been huge progress in surgical techniques, especially with regard to coronary heart disease, many interventions would not be necessary if individuals reduced their risks through improved diet and lifestyle. We will also learn how the plant’s transport system is dependent on environmental conditions to ensure that leaf cells are provided with the water and carbon dioxide that they need for photosynthesis.

Dialectic

Students will use their knowledge to predict the outcome of practical tasks, to analyse the results and report their findings. They will be encouraged to work collaboratively and come to scientific conclusions based on discussions with others.

Rhetoric

Knowledge and skills will be assessed through direct questioning, group discussion, low stakes quizzes and through a longer investigation style task which will run over the course of a number of lessons.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

In this section we will learn about the human digestive system which provides the body with nutrients and the respiratory system that provides it with oxygen and removes carbon dioxide. In each case they provide dissolved materials that need to be moved quickly around the body in the blood by the circulatory system.

Damage to any of these systems can be debilitating if not fatal. Although there has been huge progress in surgical techniques, especially with regard to coronary heart disease, many interventions would not be necessary if individuals reduced their risks through improved diet and lifestyle.

We will also learn how the plant’s transport system is dependent on environmental conditions to ensure that leaf cells are provided with the water and carbon dioxide that they need for photosynthesis.

Build a model of the digestive system.

Grow a plant and change its growing conditions. Put it in a dark place for a few days and see what happens. Don’t give it water for a few days and see what happens. Explain why the plant develops the way it does when placed under these conditions

Spring Term

Infection and Response

Grammar

Pathogens are microorganisms such as viruses and bacteria that cause infectious diseases in animals and plants. They depend on their host to provide the conditions and nutrients that they need to grow and reproduce. They frequently produce toxins that damage tissues and make us feel ill. This section will explore how we can avoid diseases by reducing contact with them, as well as how the body uses barriers against pathogens. Once inside the body our immune system is triggered which is usually strong enough to destroy the pathogen and prevent disease.

When at risk from unusual or dangerous diseases our body’s natural system can be enhanced by the use of vaccination. Since the 1940s a range of antibiotics have been developed which have proved successful against a number of lethal diseases caused by bacteria. Unfortunately many groups of bacteria have now become resistant to these antibiotics. The race is now on to develop a new set of antibiotics.

Dialectic

Students will use their knowledge to predict the outcome of practical tasks, to analyse the results and report their findings. They will be encouraged to work collaboratively and come to scientific conclusions based on discussions with others.

Rhetoric

Knowledge and skills will be assessed through direct questioning, group discussion, low stakes quizzes and through a longer investigation style task which will run over the course of a number of lessons.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

Pathogens are microorganisms such as viruses and bacteria that cause infectious diseases in animals and plants. They depend on their host to provide the conditions and nutrients that they need to grow and reproduce. They frequently produce toxins that damage tissues and make us feel ill. This section will explore how we can avoid diseases by reducing contact with them, as well as how the body uses barriers against pathogens. Once inside the body our immune system is triggered which is usually strong enough to destroy the pathogen and prevent disease.

When at risk from unusual or dangerous diseases our body’s natural system can be enhanced by the use of vaccination. Since the 1940s a range of antibiotics have been developed which have proved successful against a number of lethal diseases caused by bacteria. Unfortunately many groups of bacteria have now become resistant to these antibiotics. The race is now on to develop a new set of antibiotics.

Summer Term 1

Bioenergetics

Grammar

In this section we will explore how plants harness the Sun’s energy in photosynthesis in order to make food. This process liberates oxygen which has built up over millions of years in the Earth’s atmosphere. Both animals and plants use this oxygen to oxidise food in a process called aerobic respiration which transfers the energy that the organism needs to perform its functions. Conversely, anaerobic respiration does not require oxygen to transfer energy. During vigorous exercise the human body is unable to supply the cells with sufficient oxygen and it switches to anaerobic respiration. This process will supply energy but also causes the build-up of lactic acid in muscles which causes fatigue.

Dialectic

Students will use their knowledge to predict the outcome of practical tasks, to analyse the results and report their findings. They will be encouraged to work collaboratively and come to scientific conclusions based on discussions with others.

Rhetoric

Knowledge and skills will be assessed through direct questioning, group discussion, low stakes quizzes and through a longer investigation style task which will run over the course of a number of lessons.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

In this section we will explore how plants harness the Sun’s energy in photosynthesis in order to make food. This process liberates oxygen which has built up over millions of years in the Earth’s atmosphere. Both animals and plants use this oxygen to oxidise food in a process called aerobic respiration which transfers the energy that the organism needs to perform its functions. Conversely, anaerobic respiration does not require oxygen to transfer energy. During vigorous exercise the human body is unable to supply the cells with sufficient oxygen and it switches to anaerobic respiration. This process will supply energy but also causes the build-up of lactic acid in muscles which causes fatigue.

Find out why it is so difficult to vaccinate against viruses.

Summer Term 2

Ecology / Sampling

Grammar

The Sun is a source of energy that passes through ecosystems. Materials including carbon and water are continually recycled by the living world, being released through respiration of animals, plants and decomposing microorganisms and taken up by plants in photosynthesis.

All species live in ecosystems composed of complex communities of animals and plants dependent on each other and that are adapted to particular conditions, both abiotic and biotic. These ecosystems provide essential services that support human life and continued development. In order to continue to benefit from these services humans need to engage with the environment in a sustainable way.

In this section we will explore how humans are threatening biodiversity as well as the natural systems that support it. We will also consider some actions we need to take to ensure our future health, prosperity and well-being.

Dialectic

Students will use their knowledge to predict the outcome of practical tasks, to analyse the results and report their findings. They will be encouraged to work collaboratively and come to scientific conclusions based on discussions with others.

Rhetoric

Knowledge and skills will be assessed through direct questioning, group discussion, low stakes quizzes and through a longer investigation style task which will run over the course of a number of lessons.

In school...
How can I support this unit at home...

The Sun is a source of energy that passes through ecosystems. Materials including carbon and water are continually recycled by the living world, being released through respiration of animals, plants and decomposing microorganisms and taken up by plants in photosynthesis.

All species live in ecosystems composed of complex communities of animals and plants dependent on each other and that are adapted to particular conditions, both abiotic and biotic. These ecosystems provide essential services that support human life and continued development.

In order to continue to benefit from these services humans need to engage with the environment in a sustainable way. In this section we will explore how humans are threatening biodiversity as well as the natural systems that support it. We will also consider some actions we need to take to ensure our future health, prosperity and well-being.

Think about how you could count all the trees in a forest without having to physically count every one.
When walking on the beach look at how the flora changes from the beach to inland. Why does this change happen?

Skip to content